Recent new of plagiarism by Mega-church pastor Mark Driscoll has led to a flurry of blog posts, but it all began when Syndicated Christian radio host Janet Mefferd confronted Driscoll with examples of the plagiarized content on her Nov. 21 radio broadcast. Driscoll quickly attacked Medford as “grumpy” and denied her allegations. Supporters of Driscoll rushed to his defense, detractors pounced, but more importantly thoughtful people began to discuss the lack of integrity in “Christian” publishing.

Did Mark Driscoll plagiarize? Warren Throckmorton has a series of articles on his Patheos blog that digs into the details surrounding 4 books by Driscoll that contain questionable passages. My assessment, as a professor, is that Driscoll did plagiarize, but most likely it was due to sloppy practice and a push to publish more materials than he could possibly manage. Similar thoughts are shared by many writers including the folks like Kate Tracy at Christianity Today.

But more important than Driscoll and discussion of plagiarism, are the deeper issues of pride that have brought us to this place where men and women who cant write, hire people who can and then stamp their name on the work. Much like the fiction of the Victoria Secret model, “famous” writers create a fiction about their intelligence to impress the world with a false image of who they really are. 

John Piper has weighed in on this issue and Throckmorton chronicled his various Tweets on the topic.

Andy Crouch also has a thoughtful article in CT challenging Christians to a higher ethic in our publishing practices.

All this is to set the stage for today’s conversation on the deeper issue of Ghostwriting. In this LIVE discussion Jim Belcher, author of “Deep Church” and I take these issues head-on and answer the question, “Is Ghostwriting a form of Christian Idolatry?”

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