[PODCAST] Deconstructing Christian Leadership

[PODCAST] Deconstructing Christian Leadership

Podcast Liner Notes

As you consider the most popular role-models for Christian leadership, ask yourself this question, what exactly is uniquely “Christ-like” in how they lead?  Do they lead like Christ, or do they lead like the World and only talk about Christ?

Here are the 5 Keys to Deconstructing Christian Leadership.

1. You Can’t Lead Yourself

Self-leadership is the ultimate narcissism. Its like saying, if you want to be a great husband, be a good husband to yourself.  OR If you want to be a good parent, practice parenting yourself. It is true that you can manage your actions, but leadership is a relationship—it requires more than one person.

 2. You Can’t Lead Without Following

Following is the not the stepping stone to leadership.  It is not a hierarchy of the powerful rising above the weak.Christian- Leadership is never the next-step “beyond” following.  Followers don’t graduate into leaders, they continue following in one area while learning to lead in another.

3. You Can’t Lead Alone

The New Testament does not know anything of leadership outside the context of teams. Leaders must lead through community. It is true that for some people the word “teams” is just another word for a group of more talented followers, but real team-leadership is about a group of equals sharing the pleasure of service and the burden of authority.

4. You Can’t Lead Forever

Eventually you will die and what will your legacy be as a leader? Some situations demand you follow. Every situation demands that you lead for the next generation. My name will be forgotten, but I live so that the name of Jesus will not!

5. You Can’t Lead to Gain

The Christian leader leads to lose… to sacrifice.. to serve.. to love.  The Scripture tells us that Jesus’ disciples argued about who was greatest & Jesus said, “If you want to be first, be the very last, and the servant of all (Mark 9:34-35).  Therefore, my mission is to be an average man among an exceptional Church rather than an exceptional man among an average Church.

 Next Week

Next weeks show is about the “The Power of Generational Leadership”

Stephen Colbert on his Christian Faith, God, and Hell

Stephen Colbert on his Christian Faith, God, and Hell

In this NPR radio interview from 2007, Stephen Colbert talks about his Christian Faith, God and his view of Hell.

Colbert’s continued support for his Roman Catholic faith is reinforced in this 2012 speech as recorded on the Huffington Post.

NEW YORK — In a rare public moment out of character, actor Stephen Colbert told students at the Jesuit Fordham University on Friday that he loves the Roman Catholic Church no matter its human flaws.

The host of “The Colbert Report” talked about his faith in a discussion on humor and spirituality with New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan and the Rev. James Martin, author of “Between Heaven and Mirth” and the official chaplain of Colbert’s show.

Colbert, who has taught Sunday school classes to school-age children, said people in comedy often don’t understand how he could remain Catholic. But he said he views the church as teaching joy, which he called the “infallible sign of the presence of God.”

“I love my church – warts and all,” he said, before an audience of about 3,000 cheering students, who posted his quotes on Twitter using the organizers’ (hash)dolancolbert hashtag.

Colbert said people in comedy often make jokes at the expense of religion, but he makes jokes about what he called people’s misuse of religion in politics and other arenas. Still, he said, “If Jesus doesn’t have a sense of humor, I am in huge trouble.”

 

[INTERVIEW] William P. Young, author of “The Shack” – Part 3

More and more Christians are getting their spiritual guidance from internet resources. In our diverse culture, there are many misleading voices; which claim the name of Jesus, yet offer a deceptive Gospel. The mission of this interview series is to engage the on-line generation in an intergenerational dialogue to discern the Gospel of Jesus Christ and its application to our changing world.

This is Part 3 of 3 in the interview with Paul Young, author of The Shack.

Posts in this interview series:

  1. Part 1 of 3
  2. Part 2 of 3
  3. Part 3 of 3

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